Unperturbed by fashions of the day, he consistently and continuously developed an unmistakable signature that over the years became stylistically influential for German photography and subsequent generations of photographers. His exclusively black-and-white photographs are of strict, often symmetrical tectonics. Almost graphically, the light-dark areas stand out from one another and condense into a suggestive-symbolic expression.
His pictures do not speculate on superficial effects and quick consumption, but demand a contemplative approach from the viewer in order to open up their existential-philosophical content. In the pictorial interpretation of a situation, a greater reality and an inner state become visible in Häusser's works. In this way, the artist often anticipated later art movements with his paintings.

Robert Häusser's work has received many honors. In 1995 he received the International Prize for Photography from the Swedish-based Erna and Viktor Hasselblad Foundation. This award, which is given regardless of the camera brand, is not only the most highly endowed prize for photography, but is also considered by experts to be its Nobel Prize.